Flipped Learning: Supporting Students in Writing Workshop

Juliette flipped learning

When we work with educators who want to begin flipping lessons in their writing workshops, we regularly address major misconceptions about flipped learning. For example, we’ve been asked, “Isn’t flipped learning about students watching videos while teachers escape from doing any work?” We want teachers, administrators, parents, and students to know this is absolutely false!

Flipped learning isn’t about teaching less; it’s about students doing more!

Recently, Dana tweeted the following: “I don’t flip lessons so that I can teach less. I flip lessons so that my students can do more!” Flipped learning is not a replacement for the work that happens in the classroom during writing workshop. Teachers are irreplaceable. We play a critical role in helping students to develop as writers. Students need face-to-face interactions with teachers who listen to their struggles, celebrate their accomplishments, model new strategies, demonstrate powerful writing moves with mentor texts, and a plethora of other essential teaching that enables students to flourish as writers. Our students need us. We are their cheerleader, confidant, and counsel. Flipped lessons enhance the workshop by making it possible for students to move confidently through the writing process with support from their teacher at every turn.

Flipped learning isn’t about students watching videos; it’s about students accessing instruction.

Even though most of us could not function on a daily basis without assistance from technology, a negative association is at times made when we see students in front of computers, particularly in the classroom. The image of this can evoke fear. Fear that our students aren’t really learning; that they’re just passive viewers. Another misconception about flipped learning, because it involves students using technology, is that it results in watered-down instruction. Flipped learning isn’t about students watching videos; it’s about students accessing instruction. This instruction has been deliberately and carefully designed to help students excel academically. Delivering this instruction via technology acknowledges and honors the way many of our students enjoy learning. Technology is an indelible part of our students’ lives and therefore, should be part of the classroom. When students access flipped lessons they are not passive learners; they are working with a specific purpose in mind and are held accountable for the instruction provided in these lessons. Writer’s notebooks, exit/entrance tickets, and writing conferences are some of the ways students can demonstrate what they’ve learned and the steps they plan to take next.

ILA2016 is rapidly approaching! Dana and I are excited to learn from and alongside so many dedicated educators across the country and beyond. We are also excited to have the opportunity to discuss our thoughts about flipped learning and to converse with a global circle of educators who have ideas and questions about flipped learning, too.

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